Tag: weaning

Pip & Pear Review

Earlier this week I received the cutest chilled hamper of goodies from Pip & Pear for Frankie to review. In it we received nine different flavours such as Baby Beef Ragu, Chicken Lickin Casserole and Squashy Potato. The textures ranged from stage one (5+ months) to stage three (10+ months).

I love the story behind this Irish owned business. Pip and Pear was born when working mum of two Irene struggled to find a healthy alternative to her home cooking. Like myself she could only find heavily processed long shelf life pouches and jars. After many late nights in her restaurant ‘No.9 Barronstrand St’ she began refining recipes and soon had a dedicated baby menu with customers travelling from all over the South to stock up on her delicious homemade meals for their babies. Since being encouraged by her loyal customers she then entered the Blas na hEireann Irish Food Awards and walked away with three awards for her nutritious homemade meals. Irene then made a huge decision to bring a full range of products to the market to help parents who want to only their babies the best.

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Babypotz – Baby Food Storage Review

babypotz baby food storage container tubberware mummycooks

The one big difference between my two babies is their eating habits. I have one kid who eats bland dinners consisting of mash, veg and one meat, mainly chicken. While Frankie my littlest babog will eat anything. If he had to choose between food and his mammy, food would win every time. (more…)

Our Weaning Adventures

At four months Frankie didn’t seem satisfied solely on bottles, he started to wake up for feeds throughout the night and was taking a lot of interest in our food and sucking his pudgy little hands, so regardless of recommendations of midwives, public health nurses and the likes I decided to start weaning Frankie earlier than the six months. It is advised to start a baby on solids when they are six-months due to development and nutritional reasons.

I suppose due to these ‘rules’ administered by health care officials I wasn’t very prepared for weaning, I had no high chair, baby spoons or water-proof bibs. I decided I wanted everything organic, homemade, full of nutritious ingredients although on a few occasions I have given him puree fruit pots, they are so handy if you are out and about or if your homemades haven’t fully defrosted by snack time.

It’s so true, the nutrition baby receives in their first year will impact on their eating habits for the rest of their lives. I look at Kayla my first born,  who eats dinners solely of mash, carrots and gravy. She is a very fussy eater and that is due to my poor diet I inflicted on her in the first years. It’s something I regret immensely, since then I have changed my attitude to parenting and put my her needs before my own. Over the past year Kayla has grew a love for fruit, all fruit, so her eating habits are slowly improving. If I had of introduced all the beautiful foods there are out there sooner maybe she wouldn’t be so picky.

I decided Frankie’s first meal would be a taste of porridge, something easy and simple to make, although it didn’t happen that way. The texture was nothing like my Nana’s, it resembled gloop and had the consistency of tar. He gagged, he heaved, he cried, he projectile-spat across the room, It was a big FAIL! So maybe porridge wasn’t the best decision but you have to learn these things for yourself. You have to find what works for you and your baby.

Frankie’s first spoon feed

When he learnt to swallow food we moved onto sweet potato, carrots and butternut squash. It wasn’t until I started cooking up a storm in the kitchen that I realised all his food was orange. So as the days and weeks went by, I started introducing more food like parsnips, peas and chicken all pureed of course. He took some time accepting some of the new flavours, he would spit the food allover the room but I never gave up. He loves his food; now that I’m offering a huge variety.

Frankie is six months now and I have many worries about weaning, Kayla my four-year-old was allergic to eggs, lactose intolerant and it was around this age we discovered it. The fear of him choking on finger food also scares me, it’s natural to worry but I take it to another level. I have taken a course in First Aid to ease my anxieties.

I’m also very house proud, so when it comes to finger food I tend to opt for dry food like bread and toast, soon realising I was starting to follow my old weaning habits I had on Kayla. I’ve given in to my former ways and have given him mango, banana and cheese. I’m allowing him to explore, play and make all the mess that needs be for him to enjoy it.

Weaning is such an important part of babies’ development and I’m so proud I’ve changed my old ways and allowed him to mush, squish and squeeze these new textures and flavours whether it be into his hair, ears or nose. I won’t lie the mess can be frustrating but it’s harder to have a child who won’t eat vegetables and meat than clean up a baby after a fun meal-time.

Frankie's First Spoon Feed

Weaning Frankie

Some were along the past sixteen-weeks I lost a week of Frankie’s life. I’ve been telling everyone he was only fifteen weeks old over the past few days. It can only be ‘baby-brain’, it is excusably forgivable.

So Frankie turned sixteen-weeks yesterday and with him waking for night feeds the past couple of nights for a full bottle and gulping eight seven-ounce-bottles a day. I decided to start weaning him onto food. It is highly recommended to wait until after seventeen weeks to start spoon feeding. Although the exact time for introduction will depend on your baby.

I chose a time he was not too hungry to introduce him to spoon feeds. Trying to find the right consistency as first foods should be smooth thin puree without any lumps was pretty straight forward. I added water to Odlums Organic Porridge Oats, cooked it on the stove then blended it with my hand blender in a cup. Some foods may need to be sieved to remove lumps or fibrous parts. You can use expressed breast milk or formula to make up feeds too.

A lot of people have been questioning why I chose porridge oats instead of the usual prepacked baby rice, so here’s why: Baby rice is bland,tasteless, yet it’s sweet. This may influence babies later food choices, they are high in sugar and are highly refined, stripped of most – if not all nutrients during the processing stage. It’s then fortified with synthetic vitamins and they cost a fortune compared to a large bag of oats.

With preparation for introducing spoon feeds underway, I added the puree to my Squirt. A baby food dispensing spoon for convenient one handed feeding that I purchased from the from The Goodie Gallery. I propped Frankie up in his bouncer, with a large cushion behind to support him as I hadn’t purchased a high chair at that time.

His first spoon was hilarious. I slowly introduced the spoon to his mouth, allowing him to suckle from it. The facial expressions were priceless. One minute he was horrified, he gagged and next he smiled (when he thought his ordeal was over).

All babies gag when their weaning. I remember panicking on Kayla, this time I knew what to expect. It can be a scary experience for some first time mums watching your child gag. It can almost look and feel like their choking but this is completely normal for babies as they adjust and learn how to swallow. Babies need time to learn how to swallow food. Frankie spat out his first few spoonfuls a couple of times, but this does not mean he doesn’t like it. He is just getting used to spoon feeding. Babies may reject new tastes and textures initially, it will take several tastes before a baby will accept new flavours. Always retry any foods that baby refuses.

 There are many suggested ‘Stage 1’ foods suitable to be introduced during the weaning process. Pureed vegetable like carrot, sweet potato, spinach and turnip are perfect. The more flavours you experiment with from a younger age, there is less chance of a fussy eater in later years. Peeled and pureed fruits such as mango, avocado, plum and apples are great weaning foods too. Eggs, fish, chicken and meat can be introduced once they are well cooked. Avoid stock cubes, gravy’s and jars of sauces as they have high sodium content. Try avoid adding salt to any of babies dishes too. Some baby companies do organic stock cubes so keep an eye out when doing your weekly grocery shop.

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I will keep you updated on how we get on as I begin to introduce more foods over the next few weeks.