Tag: baby

Our Weaning Adventures

At four months Frankie didn’t seem satisfied solely on bottles, he started to wake up for feeds throughout the night and was taking a lot of interest in our food and sucking his pudgy little hands, so regardless of recommendations of midwives, public health nurses and the likes I decided to start weaning Frankie earlier than the six months. It is advised to start a baby on solids when they are six-months due to development and nutritional reasons.

I suppose due to these ‘rules’ administered by health care officials I wasn’t very prepared for weaning, I had no high chair, baby spoons or water-proof bibs. I decided I wanted everything organic, homemade, full of nutritious ingredients although on a few occasions I have given him puree fruit pots, they are so handy if you are out and about or if your homemades haven’t fully defrosted by snack time.

It’s so true, the nutrition baby receives in their first year will impact on their eating habits for the rest of their lives. I look at Kayla my first born,  who eats dinners solely of mash, carrots and gravy. She is a very fussy eater and that is due to my poor diet I inflicted on her in the first years. It’s something I regret immensely, since then I have changed my attitude to parenting and put my her needs before my own. Over the past year Kayla has grew a love for fruit, all fruit, so her eating habits are slowly improving. If I had of introduced all the beautiful foods there are out there sooner maybe she wouldn’t be so picky.

I decided Frankie’s first meal would be a taste of porridge, something easy and simple to make, although it didn’t happen that way. The texture was nothing like my Nana’s, it resembled gloop and had the consistency of tar. He gagged, he heaved, he cried, he projectile-spat across the room, It was a big FAIL! So maybe porridge wasn’t the best decision but you have to learn these things for yourself. You have to find what works for you and your baby.

Frankie’s first spoon feed

When he learnt to swallow food we moved onto sweet potato, carrots and butternut squash. It wasn’t until I started cooking up a storm in the kitchen that I realised all his food was orange. So as the days and weeks went by, I started introducing more food like parsnips, peas and chicken all pureed of course. He took some time accepting some of the new flavours, he would spit the food allover the room but I never gave up. He loves his food; now that I’m offering a huge variety.

Frankie is six months now and I have many worries about weaning, Kayla my four-year-old was allergic to eggs, lactose intolerant and it was around this age we discovered it. The fear of him choking on finger food also scares me, it’s natural to worry but I take it to another level. I have taken a course in First Aid to ease my anxieties.

I’m also very house proud, so when it comes to finger food I tend to opt for dry food like bread and toast, soon realising I was starting to follow my old weaning habits I had on Kayla. I’ve given in to my former ways and have given him mango, banana and cheese. I’m allowing him to explore, play and make all the mess that needs be for him to enjoy it.

Weaning is such an important part of babies’ development and I’m so proud I’ve changed my old ways and allowed him to mush, squish and squeeze these new textures and flavours whether it be into his hair, ears or nose. I won’t lie the mess can be frustrating but it’s harder to have a child who won’t eat vegetables and meat than clean up a baby after a fun meal-time.

Look Who’s Walking

We reached another milestone last Thursday; Frankie is now six months old. It’s shocking how fast time passes us by, it feels like only yesterday that we brought him home from the hospital. He’s thriving, he’s on solids almost two-months, gumming on finger food and sitting up unaided. In the past week he has dropped three of his seven bottles and (I’m going to whisper this just in case he hears me) he is sleeping through the night, HALLELUJAH!!

His uncle got him a walker and he loves it. It’s not even here a week and he gets so excited when he sees it coming out, kicking, cooing and grinning from ear to ear. He loves the freedom of propelling across the room. If he’s in bad form it’s almost like a soother for his feet too, once he’s in the walker he glides up and down the room exploring his future targets.

I’m fully aware crawling is essential for both physical and mental development but Frankie hates being on his belly, I refuse to force tummy time on him, he will crawl when he is good and ready. He likes to be sitting up, in his swing; he likes to see what’s going on and what everybody is doing around him.

I get why some people are against walkers, parents reaction time is hindered as babies are moving faster, reaching higher and some say development is delayed. It’s common knowledge if you leave a child unattended, accidents will happen and I would never leave him in the walker for more than twenty minutes a time. Some might say it’s lazy parenting too but I would rather have him working on his leg muscles, building up strength than have a puddle of tears to mop up after he continuously planks the floor.

Tummy Time of Torture

Frankie spent his first two weeks on his tummy flaked across my chest like most babies, during that precious bonding time. Over the next few weeks as he became more alert he decided he didn’t want to be face down in my abdomen, so then tummy time became no more.

At my last Public Health Nurse appointment, the nurse pointed out the obvious that Frankie was getting a flat head. She nagged for at least ten-minutes about how important tummy time was; motor skills this, muscles development that. Let’s just face facts, he HATES it.

Now as a result of despising tummy time he has yet to roll over from his front to back whilst on a flat surface, he is six months next week. He will sit up on his elbows for all of two minutes then he proceeds to plank the floor, kicking and screaming.

I’ve tried it all, couple minutes here, couple there and couple feckin’ everywhere. I make a shrine for my little babóg, surrounded by colourful toys. I’ve got on all fours, flopped about like a fish singing twinkle-twinkle many a times. One day he even grunted at me, pretty sure he clenched his fist in a temper too. How dare I put him on his tummy?

We have tried this…

Tummy Time

and this…

Tummy Time

and this…

photo 3 (6)

So I get how tummy time is an important aspect of the larger concept of free floor time BUT every year with every new baby there is a new technique to raise your baby. Personally I think tummy time in just a new-fangled idea to make up for the fact that babies spend way to much of their days on their back. Tummy time wasn’t a major concern four-years-ago. Kayla NEVER had tummy time, ever, she’s fine, and her motor skill and muscles developed just like any other kid.

Today I have decided to stop forcing tummy time on my little man, he doesn’t like, and I don’t even know why I tried for so long. Frankie is sitting up aided by a couple of pillows, he is able to support his own feet and loves bouncing around in his swing. His motor skills are developing just perfect too. He can pick up and grab any object in his path and manoeuvre it into his dribbly mouth. He can even hold his own bottle; bet you my PHN’s baby can’t do that. And we are signing, which is great for motor skills and muscle development, not that he has returned a sign yet but he recognizes them and he will sign over the next couple of months.

Tales of a Tired Mom

After many challenges, questions and occasional tantrums with the small, bedtime can be quiet frustrating in my household. Last week it was an utter success but unfortunately it was replaced by a week-long of sleepless nights from sundown to sunrise with thanks to my two nocturnal children.

I woke up one of the mornings to find Frankie naked from the waist down and Kayla in his cot changing his bum. With the happiest grin, thinking she was the cleverest, smartest, greatest kid in the world, I refrained from screaming, I got up went the toilet counted to ten returned and took over what she had started. Not a wipe left in the 60 pack and they are all face down in his sheets. Lovely, thanks Kayla you’re the best (sic). The two of them smiling and cooing, whilst I looked on as if I had escaped from an asylum after another sleepless night.

Last week I considered giving them up for adoption. They spent four of seven nights acting the complete bollox, here is a recorded timeline of one those nights…

7.45 Story time with the four-year-old.

8.05 She goes straight asleep, success!

8.15 Feed baby his last bottle.

8.30 Babies bedtime.

8.37 Baby cries, race up the stairs to put soother in mouth.

8.39 Breathless, sits on stairs for a few minutes.

8.42 Boils kettle, makes coffee.

8.50 Baby cries.

8.51 Trying to avoid eye contact with smiling baby.

8.52 Tuck in, soother, kiss goodnight.

9.01 Baby falls asleep.

9.03 Clicks kettle, mammy time.

10.30 Bedtime; creeps back into room, don’t breathe, get into bed.

10.41 Baby wakes up for soother.

10.50 Baby coughs.

23.04 Baby falls asleep and snores heavily; surprised neighbours cannot hear.

23.10-23.20 I fall asleep.

00.07 Four year old wakes up – to warm.

00.13 Now she’s too cold.

00.14-00.20 She falls asleep.

01.36 Baby wakes up – doesn’t know what he wants.

01.45 Falls asleep *snores (pokes baby to try stop snoring).

02.30 Baby wakes; I let baby cry it out.

02.50 I give in, bottle time.

03.56 Loud bang followed by four-year-old calling for mammy.

03.57 Tucks her in, rubs back (she fell out of bed HAHA), kisses goodnight.

03.59 She now needs to go the toilet (WTF, considers telling her she has a mattress protector).

04.00 Carries child to toilet, wipes bum, washes hands, tuck’s in.

04.06 Find four-year-old creepily loitering around bedroom door.

04.07 I allow her to co-sleep.

04.10 Baby wakes up.

04.15-04.25 Everyone asleep and snoring.

06.05 Beep Beep… BEEP, stupid van reverses up the road (I consider throwing rocks from the window).

06.40 Neighbour slams door leaving for work (considers throwing rocks again).

06.41 Everyone’s awake.

07.00 Daydreams about adoption, running away and working nights.

I’ve yet to meet a mom who hasn’t had their fair share of sleepless nights. I choose to be a mom; I choose to have two children, i do love them, it comes without saying. My god its hard work, if you’re not wiping butts, wiping up sick you’re nursing a boo-boo. So dear friends and family STOP judging me on my high level of caffeine intake, telling me I look tired, and do not judge my appearance. I am tired!!

Things I've Learnt Being A MAAAmmy

1. You will no longer laugh at the parents of hurricane hell raising children on Channel 4.

2. Counting to three will be your most commonly used phrase.

3. You will spend most of your days with a howling resident on the bottom step of your stairs.

4. You question how people in bungalows discipline their children.

5. You prefer cuddling and kids movies to hitting pubs and clubs.

6. Your home will be covered in valuable pieces of artwork that didn’t cost you a thing.

7. You will sneak sweets like it’s a contraband substance, soon mastering ramming anything that tastes good into your mouth and be able to exchange conversation with your small normally.

8. It doesn’t matter how many books, magazines and articles you read about caring for your child, every child is different and they all progress at their own pace.

9. Everything you do is an adventure.

10. Showering with a locked door behind you is a luxury.

11. Children do not understand why a mammy would ever want to have any privacy.

12. You will inherit ‘shower schizophrenia’, a constant belief your baby is crying whilst you shower.

13. You often finish up showering with only one leg shaved and have you will have a frequent presence of unwashed conditioner in your hair.

14. You may have an audience whilst showering, shouting the most awkward of questions.

15. You will never wear white again.

16. Children have one level of volume, LOUD!!

17. You are easily manipulated by puppy-dog-eyes.

18. Your washing basket will never be empty.

19, If you mop the floor, it’s guaranteed they will spill something.

20. You will spend most of your days threatening to throw away their toys, if they don’t clean them up.

21. It is perfectly acceptable to sniff a childs butt in public.

22. You can do almost anything with one hand.

23. You will re-define “sleeping-in” to any time past 7:30am.

24. You will have impeccable packing skills.

25. That it’s very rewarding to have a purpose other than yourself.

26. You will realize how amazing it is to watch children grow. Observing the confident-creative little people they become.

27. You will be wiping butts for eternity.

28. There will be a never ending trail of mush, crumbs and spills.

29. An early night is going to bed the same time as your children.

30. You will use baby wipes to clean almost everything from random spills to your whole bathroom.

31. You will have perfected the straight that’s-not-funny face when it’s actually quite hilarious.

32. You will never judge a stranger on their child’s behaviour. If anything you will sympathize.

33. Bedtime will become one of your favourite times of the day.

34. You need caffeine to get through your day.

35. Children get inhuman bursts of energy at bedtime

36. Silence is not golden. Never trust a quiet toddler.

37. Your food always looks tastier.

38. You wouldn’t change anything.

The Sibling Rivalry

So today Frankie wails that ‘pain cry’, that noise that hits the bottom of your spine. You drop whatever is in your hand and proceed like Usain Bolt to comfort, to nurture, to investigate what the happened. You find your eldest jump back in fear, muttering ‘I dunno, I was just giving him his soother’. At this moment, I now know to check for marks, bumps, scratches or teeth marks. Yes you read it right, teeth marks. Why you ask? Because Kayla is jealous of her baby brother, the sibling rivalry has landed.

Kayla was one of the first people to meet Frankie, this was important to me. Frankie was supposed to be Katie. Katie was the name Kayla chose for the baby in mammy’s belly. To some extent Kayla did not like Katie. She was the one preventing mammy from jumping on the trampoline. She was the one who made mammy tired and sleep all the time. She was the one who made mammy a hormonal raving lunatic. Everybody assumed I knew the sex, a girl obviously. Kayla would point at bump and announce mammies having a baby, her name is Katie.

In matter of fact, Katie was a boy. Me and my girl-friends were super sneaky at a re-date scan and told no one, not even Dadog. We shopped blue on the sly, stashing in random no go areas around the house. My friend Sue also had an imaginary cousin who just had popped a boy that weekend to be exact. I cannot remember if we named this baby. Anyways we bought him a lot, he was spoilt.

As any mam would, I tried to prepare Kayla. She was having none of it. She already has a brother, why would she need two, she would reassure me. Her father and I are separated and he had a beautiful little boy Charlie last year
.

I explained to Kayla about the approaching birth, I got animated books in the library, the arrival of siblings, the big sister, how to help mammy. I encouraged her to feel baby kick, talk and sing to my bump. I had never ending headaches with the amount of times she sang ‘twinkle-twinkle’ into the micro-phone (my belly button). Katie would summer sault to the sound of her voice. As my belly grew, I involved Kayla with everything. Getting my hospital bag ready, putting the crib together and even brought her along to my combined G.P visits.

Unfortunately I had a few complications, I have thrombocytopenia. I hemorrhaged which led to a couple over-night stays in hospital. Kayla did not like when Katie did this to me. Kayla did not like the idea I was not at home with her. Kayla started to resent Katie.

Then one day in March, two -weeks early Katie became Frankie. Kayla was excited to come see me and her new brother. She had a cuddle but we knew she was disappointed. She suggested swapping him with a mammy in my ward.

I became an over protective mummy, I snapped be gentle, whispered be quiet, pulled her away from hanging over the moses-basket as she almost knocks it down. She accepted her new sibling. She helped with all the nappy changes, picked out his outfit for the day and helped make bottles.

Kayla was involved in everything so I’m rather shocked when she ha sudden bursts of aggression. Frankie clearly did nothing to physically hurt her, emotionally she was broken. She did not deny his existence. She enjoyed the special attention from visitors. She enjoyed having mammy home all day, every day. But unfortunately I could see cracks and slight resentment creeping in. Frankie got to sleep in my room. Frankie got lots cuddles. Kayla did not have my full attention anymore. Kayla was no longer my only baby.

Naturally I tried spending extra one-on-one time with her. We made jig-saws, watched girly movies and went through photo albums of her as a baby and toddler. I let her unwrap any present Frankie got. Kayla is spoilt rotten and everyone dotes on her, I think she got more presents than Frankie in his first week.

Then one day, I left her to mind Frankie, for two minutes, while I went upstairs to get a blanket.  I thought I could trust her. Whatever she did to him, it hurt. I never heard a scream like it from a baby in all my life. He was six-pounds in weight, not an ounce of fat to be seen. She tried to reassure me ‘he just started crying’ until I exhausted all options and checked his nappy. There it was, a red raw mark on his thigh. The fury, the angry, the utter disbelief raged through my body. I almost wanted to hold her down and do what she did to him. I wanted her to feel the pain she occurred to Frankie. I obviously could not do that, so I asked what really happened.

I encouraged her to tell me how she felt. I gave her as much attention as I possibly could. I involved her with every aspect of bringing Frankie home, to helping out, naming and even bathing in the first few weeks. She had a hidden streak of jealousy that only arose when left alone with my little man.

Just as I thought she was adjusting, learning to trust her again. Boom, like a happy slap to the face – she bit him, in the arm this time. The cry melted my heart. The incident melted my brain. Why would she do such a thing?

At this stage Frankie is smiling, cooing even sharing a bath with her. She just gets these sudden urges of being in control and hurts him, for no reason, whatsoever. When I’m feeding Frankie, I feel she is trying to hijack all my attention. Don’t get me wrong, this has only happened three-times, although once is enough. She just gets these sudden urges to hurt him. Whether it is attention seeking, power or sudden outbursts of jealousy I shall not be leaving her alone with Frankie until I can trust her behavior has changed. It’s an unfortunate fact of life, the sibling rivalry has landed.

Frankie's First Spoon Feed

Weaning Frankie

Some were along the past sixteen-weeks I lost a week of Frankie’s life. I’ve been telling everyone he was only fifteen weeks old over the past few days. It can only be ‘baby-brain’, it is excusably forgivable.

So Frankie turned sixteen-weeks yesterday and with him waking for night feeds the past couple of nights for a full bottle and gulping eight seven-ounce-bottles a day. I decided to start weaning him onto food. It is highly recommended to wait until after seventeen weeks to start spoon feeding. Although the exact time for introduction will depend on your baby.

I chose a time he was not too hungry to introduce him to spoon feeds. Trying to find the right consistency as first foods should be smooth thin puree without any lumps was pretty straight forward. I added water to Odlums Organic Porridge Oats, cooked it on the stove then blended it with my hand blender in a cup. Some foods may need to be sieved to remove lumps or fibrous parts. You can use expressed breast milk or formula to make up feeds too.

A lot of people have been questioning why I chose porridge oats instead of the usual prepacked baby rice, so here’s why: Baby rice is bland,tasteless, yet it’s sweet. This may influence babies later food choices, they are high in sugar and are highly refined, stripped of most – if not all nutrients during the processing stage. It’s then fortified with synthetic vitamins and they cost a fortune compared to a large bag of oats.

With preparation for introducing spoon feeds underway, I added the puree to my Squirt. A baby food dispensing spoon for convenient one handed feeding that I purchased from the from The Goodie Gallery. I propped Frankie up in his bouncer, with a large cushion behind to support him as I hadn’t purchased a high chair at that time.

His first spoon was hilarious. I slowly introduced the spoon to his mouth, allowing him to suckle from it. The facial expressions were priceless. One minute he was horrified, he gagged and next he smiled (when he thought his ordeal was over).

All babies gag when their weaning. I remember panicking on Kayla, this time I knew what to expect. It can be a scary experience for some first time mums watching your child gag. It can almost look and feel like their choking but this is completely normal for babies as they adjust and learn how to swallow. Babies need time to learn how to swallow food. Frankie spat out his first few spoonfuls a couple of times, but this does not mean he doesn’t like it. He is just getting used to spoon feeding. Babies may reject new tastes and textures initially, it will take several tastes before a baby will accept new flavours. Always retry any foods that baby refuses.

 There are many suggested ‘Stage 1’ foods suitable to be introduced during the weaning process. Pureed vegetable like carrot, sweet potato, spinach and turnip are perfect. The more flavours you experiment with from a younger age, there is less chance of a fussy eater in later years. Peeled and pureed fruits such as mango, avocado, plum and apples are great weaning foods too. Eggs, fish, chicken and meat can be introduced once they are well cooked. Avoid stock cubes, gravy’s and jars of sauces as they have high sodium content. Try avoid adding salt to any of babies dishes too. Some baby companies do organic stock cubes so keep an eye out when doing your weekly grocery shop.

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I will keep you updated on how we get on as I begin to introduce more foods over the next few weeks.

 

Decoding your Babies Cries

I read somewhere that most mothers are able to tell what their babies want by the sound of their cries. We understand the difference of a hungry and pain cry. The first time I heard Frankie’s ‘pain’ cry I got really worried and we ended up in hospital that night (see Frankie got a Freddie). I’ve been listening to his cries and done some research to try understand the difference in babies cries. Decoding their cries can help ease both mummy and baby frustration at such a helpless age.

The Hungry Cry (or thirst)
This is probably the first thing you think of when your baby cries. It’s a repetitive cry and just gets louder and louder. It eventually turns frantic. This cry tends to sounds like ‘Neeeh’ it comes from the suckling reflux.
Some other signs of hunger is smacking of the lips, putting hands in their mouth, pushing head from left to right in a swift fast movement. If they put their tongue to the top of the mouth, it’s more than likely that they want a feed.

The Wind Cry
Shortly after eating if your baby lets out piercing or intense cries they may have tummy pain. If they draw up their legs or are visibly uncomfortable when you lay them on their back. The cry ‘Ehhh’ is the reflex sounds usually associated when they are trying to push wind from their belly.
The usual repeated back-rubs and gentle smacks, holding babies back and chin up straight usually do the trick and bring relief to baby. Infacol and Gripe-water are some mummy favourites to help relieve trapped wind also.

The Tired & Overstimulated Cry
This is when your baby’s cry is inconsistent and it may alternate between laughter and fussing. Your babies crying can be fairly soft, and it starts and stops. You may be able to soothe your baby, but eventually the crying intensifies. The yawn reflex normally sound like ‘Owwwh’
Babies grow so much in the first few months. Even though it looks like they don’t do much other than goo and gaah, their growing each and everyday and that can leave the body exhausted. Some days they may need more sleep than others.

The Constipation Cry
It’s hard angry like grunting cry, sound like ‘Ehhair’. Baby may need to have a bowel movement or have intestinal gas. Stimulating the rectum, cycling the legs and pushing them up can help ease and relieve some pain. Some people tend to feed brown sugar and water to help quicken bowel movement also.

The Pain Cry (Sick)
This is the cry every mothers worst nightmare. Your baby’s cry sounds unusual, its different from any of the regular cries you’re used to hearing. If you have tried all of the above I would check babies temperature and seek advice from your G.P.

The Colic Cry
Babies who tend to cry for more than three hours a day, for three or more days a week, chances are baby is colicky. It is described as an constant excessive cry in an otherwise healthy baby. Your babies belly tends to be enlarged or swollen, they can pass wind as they cry and are sometimes inconsolable at a particular time of the day like the late afternoon or evening. Also seek medical advice, babies formula may need changing.

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It’s a tough thing for both you and your baby to go through. Ask for help from friends or relatives. Remember babies can sense frustration and it’s absolutely perfectly normal to put your baby down in a safe place and walk away for a few minutes to get a break.

 

Beach Hack | Talcum Powder and the Sand

My latest parenting beach hack is just in time for summer. For some talcum powder is not only fantastic at keeping babies’ bottoms dry and helping to prevent nappy rash – baby talcum powder is my secret weapon at the beach. It’s always in the boot of my car along with some suncream. (more…)

Frankie gets a Freddie

 Last week we ended up in Tallaght hospital with 10 week old Frankie. We had a great day when suddenly, late in the afternoon, he started feeling very warm and sweaty but he had no temperature. Shortly after he refused bottles, his nappies became dry and he became very irritable. Initially I though he was constipated even though he had pooped that morning. Massaging his belly, cycling his legs round, trying him with some water but to no avail. He seemed in a lot of discomfort at first but soon that dreaded ‘pain cry‘ burst out. My heart was broken. So I rang the hospital and they recommended we bring him in immediately.
It was a stressful night, and that was before I put the phone down. I ran towards the car, forgetting that I had lent mine out earlier that night. We had to find a sitter for Kayla, who hadn’t a clue what was going on. I then prepared a bag for the possibility over an over-night stay. In the middle of all this, I remembered Kayla had squeezed Frankie earlier that morning. Had she pushed in his fontanelles? Had she squeezed him so hard and broke a rib? The things going through my head would give any new mommy nightmares. We arrived after what felt like an hour.
We saw the triage nurse straight away and we were ushered into a cubicle. The nurse now asked for a urine sample. I wanted to scream out “are you for real? He’s had a dry nappy for 8 hours now!!” – Luckily for her I refrained. We got one shortly after, with the results coming back with higher than normal white cells. I don’t know about you, but with high or abnormal white cells you think the worst.  Soon after, a Freddie was inserted into his tiny little hand. Having thrombocytopenia, I’m not one bit squeamish with needles. (although I have issues with the B.C.G, that one bloody well hurts tiny newborns, they need to invent an oral solution or something.) They took a blood sample, sent it off to the lab and put him on an IV drip as he was becoming very dehydrated. 
Screaming,and clearly in a lot of pain and discomfort, the doctor did a full body examination only to find his foreskin was very tight and he immediately rang for a surgeon to come down. I googled the life out of my phone and came to the conclusion he might need a circumcision, a very common procedure nowadays. I can totally live with that.
We were transferred up to a ward, still attached to an IV. He had finally stopped crying, and had a wet nappy. Forty-five minuets after putting my head to the rock solid mattress, another doctor came around to declare he had a viral infection of the ears, nose and throat. She came to this conclusion as his throat was a little red. (Of course it’s going to be red after 4 hours of screaming every ten minutes!!) Me half asleep couldn’t even determine who was in the room never mind clearly register what the doctor had been saying.
A couple of hours later I wasn’t sure if the doctor had really been, so I marched up-to the nurses station to figure out if I’d be dreaming or not. I had no recollection of her opening his nappy, looking at his trunk or even picking him up. I questioned if the surgeon had been whilst I was snoozing. By the look of the nurses face she hadn’t a clue what I was talking about.
I demanded another doctor come down to do a full body examination. As far as I was concerned I was waiting on a surgeon. Again, this doctors diagnosis was a viral infection. A few hours later Frankie started downing his 3-4 hourly, 5 oz feeds. The only proof of his horrid ordeal is the little bruise where his Freddie was inserted. 
Like most other parents, I believe a ‘viral infection’ is another word for ‘i haven’t a clue what’s wrong with him’. I didn’t have a great experience with the doctors this time in my local hospital. I left feeling that they had thought I overreacted rushing him in for not drinking his bottles. I couldn’t care less what they think and we decided we were going for a second opinion about his little manhood as the very first doctor was very concerned.
We brought him to our local G.P and he was astonished at the fact the doctor was originally concerned about his penis. It exactly how it should be. He made us giggle saying he’d ‘love to give that doctor a slap’. If that not enough to calm my nerves nothing will.
I just wished through this little ordeal that he could talk and tell us what was wrong with him like any parent would. Wished their life away. It’s horrible knowing something is wrong and you just don’t know what it is and have to go to hospitals, G.P’s etc. to find out. 
It’s a week now and he is still perfect in every way. Hopefully no more hospital visits for a long long time.
As for me… I’ve eventually got my cast off and started physiotherapy, but unfortunately three days later split my head open. I’m on the mend with four staples and some Tylex. Maternity Leave is certainly not serving me well. Lets hope that’s the last of the hospital visits ehh…
Until our next adventure
Kellie x